the humble bumble bee

(Source: konczakowski, via potatoechippe)

archiemcphee:

There’s something awesome about a thing that’s so cute, it transcends cuteness to become nightmarishly creepy. That’s precisely the case with these impressively freaky pears, photographed last year at a supermarket in Beijing, China.

The pears are shaped like this by placing them inside special molds when they’re still very small. As they grow they fill the mold and take on its shape. They were marketed at the grocery store as “happy/joyful doll pears,” but we think they look like they’re patiently waiting for you to try taking a bite out of them, at which point they’ll start screaming bloody murder, or worse, turn you into a creepy pear-doll-person too.

[via Neatorama and RocketNews24]

archiemcphee:

Something awesome, surreal and possibly even a little bit magical is happening on a quiet street in the Toxteth district of Liverpool, England. Every night, when the clock strikes 10:00pm, the sliding storefront shutter on a derelict building opens to reveal a radiant blue tank of water filled with live, luminous jellyfish silently swimming around the space.

This dreamlike scene is a site-specific art installation created by artistic duo Walter Hugo & Zoniel for the Liverpool Biennial. Entitled The Physical Possibility of Inspiring Imagination in the Mind of Someone Living, the piece was not promoted in advance in any way. Instead it simply started happening and will continue making its punctual 10pm appearance until July 27, 2014.

If you can’t make it to Liverpool before the end of the month, you can click here to watch some video footage of the installation, which was shared by Neal Bryant.

[via designboom]

archiemcphee:

American visual artist Liza Lou creates awesome art installations using millions of tiny glass beads. Everything you see in these photos is made of or covered in beads.

Born in New York, Lou founded a studio collective in 2005 in South Africa, where the traditional craft of beadwork still thrives. Although she does not explicitly use African beading practices in her art, she works with Zulu artisans there who have worked with bead art for generations.

These photos show Liza Lou’s first major work, entitled Kitchen and Backyard, which was created over a 5 year period, from 1991 to 1996. Every single element of the full-scale replica of a suburban kitchen - the beautifully tiled walls and floor, the cabinetry, a bag of potato chips on a table (and the table), a pie in the oven (and the oven), and the dirty dishes and water in the sink - is covered in millions of hand-glued glass beads that were applied one at a time using tweezers.

Visit Liza Lou’s website to view more of her amazing artwork.

[via Designboom]

humansofnewyork:

"He wants to go home."

I want to too

humansofnewyork:

"He wants to go home."

I want to too

Tupelo
#shiba #selfie #lol